9 Simple Tips for Making Your Website Disability-Friendly

The Internet isn’t always “one size fits all.” Every day, inaccessible web design prevents billions of people in the disabled community from an easy online experience.

For those with visual impairments, learning difficulties, hearing loss and more, there are dozens of unique challenges waiting behind every URL. But building a disability-friendly site is a lot simpler than you might think.

Laurence Berry, a designer for UK-based design and tech organization FutureGov who has also written extensively about accessible web design, says the easiest way to build user-friendly sites is to figure out their key obstacles.

“This sounds pretty obvious, but understanding the problems people with disabilities face on the web is the key to building an accessible product,” he says in an email interview withMashable.

Knowing is half the battle, but implementing the necessary changes for a more inclusive web experience can seem daunting. However, you’re hurting yourself if your website isn’t accessible to those with disabilities.

“If you just want to look at it from a strictly commercial perspective, if sites don’t consider disabled users, they’re missing out on a huge chunk of the market,” says Sandi Wassmer, a technologist and design expert who registered blind in 2008.

Approximately one billion people in the world live with disabilities

Approximately one billion people in the world live with disabilities, according to the UN. That’s a sizable chunk indeed.

In addition to those born with disabilities, Wassmer points out another user group to be aware of — the aging population.

“Some of the natural signs of aging, such as loss of sensory acuity, ability to process cognitive load and fine motor skills, all impact how older people interact with technology,” she says.

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