Dueling Banjos – Sleepy Man Banjo Boys – Revenge of the Guitar Wednesday, May 14 2014 

 

Dueling Banjos – Sleepy Man Banjo Boys – Revenge of the Guitar

Advertisements

Gchat Is Starting to Look Much More Like Google Hangouts Wednesday, May 14 2014 

Gchat Is Starting to Look Much More Like Google Hangouts

Some Gmail users noticed a big change to the Gchat feature on Tuesday, which now looks like a lot more like Google’s voice and video chat service, Hangouts.

The biggest visual update to Gchat is the inclusion of bubbled profile pictures next to each contact’s name. These images are pulled in from the user’s Google+ social network.

Google has incrementally been making Gchat an extension of its Hangouts — and now, it closely resembles it, too.

SamanthaMurphy

 

Writen by

Samantha Murphy Kelly

Samantha Murphy is a Tech Reporter for Mashable, where she covers all things tech and entertainment. She joined the Mashable team in 2011 and is based in New York.

Change of direction Monday, May 12 2014 

 

I am currently taking a course in building web pages.  We’re having some Teacher issues here.  In the past six months or so we’ve had three teachers.  Thank God for utube and teamtreehouse.com.  So blogging is no longer required for the class, though I am having so much fun blogging I’m going keep on blogging, but with what I want to blog about!  Not only technology subjects, as required in the past, but music https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fB8UTheTR7s, health topics and whatever stray thoughts that cross my mind at a speed slow enough that I can catch it and write about it.

Ask a Dev: What Are the Limitations of Beacons? Monday, May 12 2014 

In our latest Ask a Dev video, iOS engineer Dan Murrell discusses the limitations of beacons, and some of the issues developers might encounter while working with this new technology.

Beacons can pinpoint the location of a device, and then exchange data with that device. Beacons can sync with certain apps to enhance many digital experiences — improving the way we shop at stores or helping us to find movie showtimes on the go. There’s even abeacon beer crawl. However, as with all new technologies, it does have its limitations and weaknesses.

“One of the best ways to explore the full potential of a new technology is to find its limitations,” says Murrell. “If we want to take advantage of all its features, we need to understand its problems and its pitfalls too”.

Check out the video above to learn more about beacons, and don’t forget to check out ourAsk a Dev YouTube channel and subscribe.

photo

 In our latest Ask a Dev video, iOS engineer Dan Murrell discusses the limitations of beacons, and some of the issues developers might encounter while working with this new technology.

Beacons can pinpoint the location of a device, and then exchange data with that device. Beacons can sync with certain apps to enhance many digital experiences — improving the way we shop at stores or helping us to find movie showtimes on the go. There’s even abeacon beer crawl. However, as with all new technologies, it does have its limitations and weaknesses.

“One of the best ways to explore the full potential of a new technology is to find its limitations,” says Murrell. “If we want to take advantage of all its features, we need to understand its problems and its pitfalls too”.

Check out the video above to learn more about beacons, and don’t forget to check out ourAsk a Dev YouTube channel and subscribe.

Our developer experts are from Mutual Mobile, a leading development and design firm that builds mobile strategies for top companies such as Audi, Google and Citigroup. The team is eager to answer your questions about mobile, so ping us with your top queries on Twitter, using the hashtag #AskaDev. Don’t forget to check out our Ask a Dev YouTube channel andsubscribe.

BONUS: How to use GPS in a hybrid app

Armand Valdes

Video Intern, New Yorker with a heart of gold.

How Documents Stored On Box And Dropbox Could End Up On Google Thursday, May 8 2014 

A rival to both cloud-storage services explains how links to your Dropbox and Box documents could end up in the wrong hands.

Image

Those files you’re storing on cloud services like Dropbox or Box may not be as secure as you think.

Both services, like other cloud-storage providers, allow users to share links to their stored documents. But sending those links out, even to trusted individuals, can also inadvertently give third parties access to your files as well, according to findings publicized by the file-sharing company Intralinks—which, by the way, is a competitor to both Box and Dropbox.

Dropbox says it’s working to fix the problem by disabling any previously shared links that might be vulnerable to leakage. Box released an email statement saying that it has found no evidence that anyone has abused such “open links” and touting the various privacy settings it offers its users to “help manage access to their content.”

Intralinks chief security officer John Landy wrote that his company inadvertently stumbled upon the vulnerability in the course of running a Google Adwords campaign that mentioned its competitors. That campaign turned up shared-file URLs that led straight to sensitive files that ordinary users had stored on Box and Dropbox—including bank records, mortgage applications and tax returns. Security blogger Graham Cluley, who also blogs for Intralinkprovides some examples.

How That Leakage Happens

How, exactly, that happened involves some conjecture. Landy wrote that some Dropbox and Box users apparently created shared links to their files, which they or their recipients then mistakenly entered into a browser search box instead of the URL bar. Doing so and then clicking on an ad—which may seem a fairly unlikely occurrence, at least until you multiply it by the number of people sharing files across the Internet—would then send the file’s URL to the ad network.

One Intralinks executive quoted by Cluley estimated that in one of the company’s Adwords campaign, five percent of all hits (presumably meaning ad clicks) yielded URLs to private files, half of which required no password to access. That “small” campaign turned up more than 300 documents.

There’s also a second way links to private files could leak out to the world. If a shared Dropbox or Box document itself contains links to other sites, clicking on one will pass along the document’s URL to the next website as part of what’s known as a referer header, where administrators of the second site could see it.

It’s not clear if similar vulnerabilities exist for other cloud-storage services such as Google Drive or Microsoft OneDrive.

No Password Required

The problem for Box and Dropbox is that they don’t make their shared links more secure, Landy wrote. Recipients of shared links should have to log into the service to authenticate themselves by default, he suggested.

Dropbox engineering vice president Aditya Agarwal said in a blog post that his company hasn’t detected any malicious attacks involving shared file URLs. Dropbox decided to disable any affected document links anyway. The vulnerability has been patched for any shared links going forward, so only previously shared items are affected.

Dropbox customers can recreate their shared links, and the company will restore old links as it confirms that particular documents aren’t vulnerable. Agarwal also noted that Dropbox for Business users can require password access to shared files; ordinary users of Dropbox’s free service don’t have that option.

The Dropbox post only addresses one of the two vulnerabilities outlined by Intralinks—the leak-via-referer-header method. In an update, Agarwal wrote that Dropbox is aware that file URLs could leak via search engines that pass them to ad partners, but said that issue is “well known” and that the company “doesn’t consider it a vulnerability.”

Like Dropbox for Business customers, users of Box can also require passwords for file access, although in neither case is that security feature turned on by default. “Box also displays a message to help users understand the permissions for their content,” a Box spokesperson said via email.

http://readwrite.com/2014/05/07/shared-links-dropbox-box-security-risks#awesm=~oDFTmgWrY65Ru7

By

 Anthony Myers May 07, 2014

 

Twitter Fail! 15 Things You Should Never Do On Twitter Thursday, May 8 2014 

By Tara Struyk

http://www.techopedia.com/2/29536/internet/web-20/twitter-fail-15-things-you-should-never-do-on-twitterTakeaway:

Twitter can be a great marketing tool. It can be a great way to network. It’s awesome for content marketing. Unless you mess it up.

Twitter Fail! 15 Things You Should Never Do On Twitter

Source: Flickr/xioubin low

Everyone’s on Twitter. Your friends, your colleagues, your boss, your kids, and even a whole bunch of petsinanimate objects and fictional characters. Businesses too, and in increasing numbers. According to a survey by Constant Contact that was released in March 2013, 25 percent of small businesses are now using Twitter, compared to only 7 percent last year. A 2012 survey found that Twitter was the most popular social network among big companies, with 73 percent of Fortune 500 companies reporting that they have a Twitter account.It’s not all hype. Twitter can be a great marketing tool. It can be a great way to network. It’s awesome for content marketing. Unless you mess it up, in which case you’ll probably end up looking like an idiot … or at least lose a few followers.

Want to get it right? Here are 15 things you absolutely should not do on Twitter. (For tips on how businesses can use social media, read Jedi Strategies for Social Media Management.)

Be an Egg

You know that little egg you get as a profile picture if you don’t bother to upload one? It’s anonymous, faceless and totally unengaging, which is exactly how you’ll come across if you use it. And that’s a best-case scenario. The worst case is that people will assume you’re a spammer.

Set Up Auto DMs

Twitter’s a social network for sharing cool stuff in a relatively public way; it isn’t for spamming people with offers or bugging them to sign up for your newsletters/reports/free e-book downloads. Or at least it shouldn’t be. When you share and engage with people via tweets, that is the networking. If you do it right, it’s a way to spread a message, boost brand awareness and even drive traffic to your site. Trying to squeeze more out of it by terrorizing people through direct messaging is like wearing a self-promotional sandwich board to a business lunch: annoyingly over the top. (Get more great tips in Social Media: How to Do It Right.)

Only Share Your Own Stuff

You probably know someone who monopolizes the conversation and only talks about him or herself. What a jerk. If you only post content from your own site or business and fail to interact with other people on Twitter, you’re sort of a jerk too. Social media is about beingsocial. Use your social skills.

Set Up an Auto Tweet Announcing How Many People Unfollowed You

Yes, there are actually apps that will determine who has unfollowed you on Twitter and tweet it out on your account. Maybe someone unfollowed you because they disagreed with your viewpoints, didn’t find value in your Tweets or just plain found you boring. Or maybe it wasn’t about you at all. On Twitter, people follow and unfollow other users all the time. No matter what the reason, announcing it is obnoxious. And really, Twitter has enough drama going on as it is. 

Talk Too Much (Especially About Yourself)

A normal (and by normal, I mean “real-world”) conversation goes like this: One person talks, the other listens, and vice versa. Unless you’re a comedian who can deliver a great punchline every time you Tweet, you’d better start listening, responding, retweeting and generally being a good conversationalist.

Ask People to Follow You

Will you be my friend? Please? Relationships got a lot more sophisticated than that right around the time you hit first grade. People will follow you because they want to, not because you ask.

Talk Yourself Up

You might be totally rad. If so, wait for someone else to say it. And please don’t use words like “maven,” “junkie” or “ninja” (especially ninja – I doubt you’ve flipped out and killed someone lately) in your Twitter bio. It makes you look like an @ss.

Use Too Many Hashtags

Hashtags work. They help other users find relevant content. In that way, they might help other users find you. #A #tweet #with #too #many #hashtags #looks #ugly. What hashtags are supposed to do is alert users about the conversation you’re joining, or what’s important or relevant about the link you’re posting. The hashtag eyeball assault that’s become common on Twitter is pointless. (Learn more important hashtag etiquette in Streamline the Conversation: How and Why Twitter Hashtags Work.)

Game Your Follower Count

Yes, you can buy Twitter followers. They are cheap. They might even be real, at least in the sense that they’re real people in some low-wage country being paid to maintain a Twitter account. What they aren’t is fans of your company, your business or your content. They don’t buy your product, or spread the word about what you have to offer. And they might even expose your real followers to spam (or you to embarrassment if people find out.)

Tweet Inspirational Quotes

A quote or two can be cool, especially if it has some specific relevance, but if you want to be social you should really have something to say. Otherwise you’ll come off as a wind-up toy. It won’t be long before people stop winding you up.

Use Too Much Stupid Vocabulary

Tweeple, 140 characters creates enough confusion in the Twittersphere, and that’s without made-up words like tweetheart and twesume. They’re less than twitterific … and they sound like a speech impediment.

Send Multiple Tweets

Tweets are 140 characters for a reason. There are some good applications for writing what are called “tall tweets.” Use them if you’re going over the limit, but do it judiciously. The best Twitter feeds have short, engaging messages and links that beg to be clicked. They don’t read like a novel.

Overtweet

In terms of an optimal number of tweets per day, there is a “tweetspot” (sorry, last one). According to a study released by Buddy Media in 2012, that number is about four per day. After that, you begin to suffer diminishing returns. Plus, if you flood your followers’ feeds, you’ll annoy the heck out of them.

Retweet Compliments, Retweets or Thank You Tweets

This might be a bit of a gray area, but retweets should be about saying, “Hey, look what this guy said. I like it, so I’m sharing it with you.” It shouldn’t be about “Hey, look what this guy said about me.” That’s what the Favorite button is for.

Send Spam

There’s a fine line between promoting your product and spamming your followers. This is especially true for those who sell a product or service. Yes, your followers might like to know about product offerings and promotions now and then. What they don’t want is to be plugged into your non-stop advertising channel. That’s grounds for an unfollow.

What Twitter etiquette rules do you live by? What do other Twitter users do to irritate you? Are you doing some of things on my list of don’ts and seeing success as a result? Let me know @TaraStruyk.

11 Brutal Reminders That You Can and Will Get Fired for What You Post on Facebook Wednesday, May 7 2014 

11 Brutal Reminders That You Can and Will Get Fired for What You Post on Facebook

https://www.yahoo.com/tech/11-brutal-reminders-that-you-can-and-will-get-fired-for-84931050659.html

In this new society that we’ve all agreed to be a part of, your Facebook page is an extension of yourself. For this reason, it’s not a good idea to post anything there that you wouldn’t normally say, for example, to your boss.

The unfortunate folks below didn’t get that memo. Here are 11 examples of Facebookers who weren’t so careful with what they shared and, as a result, put their employment statuses in jeopardy because of it.

(VERY RELATED: Check out our guide to keeping your Facebook posts private, especially from people who can fire you.)

 

Written by

Daniel Bean

Editorial Assistant

May 6, 2014

Sony Supersizes Data Storage With 185-Terabyte Cassette Tape Wednesday, May 7 2014 

Image

Pete Pachal

http://mashable.com/2014/05/05/sony-185tb-tape/

Martin’s thoughts:  I would subtitle this article “Everything Old is New Again”  Magnetic reel to reel tapes were used as data storage in the 1960’s.  Now they are growing magnetic particles.  Molecular sized particles are coming;  Vulcans and Klingons together can’t stop this from happening.

 

 

The iPod let you put your entire music collection in your pocket. Now Sony has something that could let you put the world’s music collection in your pocket: a cassette tape that holds 185 terabytes of data.

To put that in perspective, the tape can hold about 60 million songs — far more than anyone could listen to in their lifetime (that would be about 17 million, assuming continuous listening for 100 years, even while sleeping, and 3 minutes per song). All of the printed works of the Library of Congress add up to only about 10 terabytes.

The recording density of the 185TB tape is about 74 times the capacity of current tapes,Sony claims. It was able to achieve heretofore unheard of storage powers by better controlling the tiny magnetic particles that are “grown” to record individual 1s and 0s. Sony optimized a commonly-used process called “sputter deposition,” which creates the particles to keep them from growing too big as well as making their magnetic properties more uniform. At the same time, a magnetic “underlayer” of the tape is developed independently to minimize potential disruptions.

The result is a recording medium whose magnetic particles don’t exceed 7.7 nanometers in diameter, and a tape capable of holding every single tweet on Twitter (which was about 85TBa year ago).

It’s in big-data applications that such a high-density tape is really needed. Facebook, for example, stores more than 300 petabytes of data from its users (a petabyte is 1,000 terabytes), and that data has to go somewhere. Tapes are used for most high-capacity data archiving for the simple reason that the storage density rivals anything else.

With Sony’s storage breakthrough, it looks like tape is here to stay. And Big Data just got a potent tool for making its even bigger ambitions really happen.

Nokia to Focus on ‘Smart Car’ Technologies Tuesday, May 6 2014 

 

Like it or not, smart car are coming.  As of 2014, the technology is too new and requires major infrastructure  changes to be a worthwhile change.  As the technology is selected and settles down to a very few compatible companies we will see more of this.

 

https://www.yahoo.com/tech/nokia-to-focus-on-smart-car-technologies-84846728324.html

Nokia has announced that it will invest $100 million into companies and products that will be important to the “connected and intelligent vehicles” of the future. The new venture capital fund will seek to invest in (among other things) the mapping and location services that have become a big part of the cellphone maker’s business.

Molly Mosendz, The WireMay 5, 2014

xQh1o2_BRL3m7p79_KXUjER2poY

Nokia itself has been heavily focused on location services since 2008, when it purchased map provider NAVTEQ. It also acquired the 3D map technology company earthmine in 2012. Currently, Nokia provides map data to Amazon, Microsoft, Yahoo, and several car navigation systems.

Rajeev Suri, Nokia president and CEO, believes that the “connected car” market will bring significant growth and a solid return on investment. Considering that the company is pouring $100 million into this venture fund, Nokia had better hope people like smart cars more than they like Smart Cars.

Paul Asel, partner at Nokia Growth Partners (which will manage the fund), said, “For the last few years there has been a surge in innovation that has brought technological advances leading to safer, cleaner, increasingly connected, intelligent, and more affordable vehicles. Vehicles are becoming a new platform for technology adoption very similar to phones or tablets.” Asel plans to lead the venture fund by investing in companies that specialize in auto ecosystems, local services and personal mobility.

RELATED: UAE’s Etihad Airlines Has Built the Fanciest Commercial Airplane in the World

The connected vehicle market is heating up, as Nokia will be up against the likes of Google and Apple. Google is already working with car manufacturers to integrate the Android operating system into dashboards, not to mention its extensive work on self-driving vehicles. Apple has CarPlay, available in select 2014 car models, which offers the iOS experience on your dash. Because Google and Nokia both have mammoth location systems in their portfolios, it is likely they will go head to head on a location services feature in the future.

This article was originally published at The Wire.

 

 

 

5 Ways to Make Your WiFi Network Safer, Faster, and More Reliable Tuesday, May 6 2014 

5 Ways to Make Your WiFi Network Safer, Faster, and More Reliable

Dan-Tynan

 Tech ColumnistMay 5, 2014

https://www.yahoo.com/tech/5-ways-to-make-your-wifi-network-safer-faster-and-84841168994.html

e9e0223d9348e1f932ebf9d39e2d987df5bfec29

« Previous PageNext Page »

Steven Ruiz tech news

WebDev-Learner

Web Design & Development

"Make it Colorful. Make it Happy"

Patricia Tallman

Sharing life with you!

Martin

Whether you believe you can do something or not, you are right. ------------------------Henry Ford

Ms. Pinedo's Web Dev Class

“Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.” ― Mahatma Gandhi

hellsfunnybelle

The Snarky Side of the South

adamnathan.com

Featuring the writing of Adam Nathan on midlife, music, and the media.

The Rocky Safari

A strange place for the curious & adventurous.

The Daily Post

The Art and Craft of Blogging

WordCamp Central

WordCamp is a conference that focuses on everything WordPress.

The WordPress.com Blog

The latest news on WordPress.com and the WordPress community.

patricia.pinedo

There is no "reset button in life"

haleyheartkeepers

written in the language of the heart